Notes From Gunning For Eddie


Some of my notes from the 2001 article, Gunning For Eddie:

Wonderland legend Nils Grevilius is quoted in the piece. And so is Nash’s common-law Armenian wife, Estee, even though Nash told her “No!”. And a bunch of other people, but the victims/murders are barely mentioned, and a very unflattering death photo of Richardson is published. It’s very disturbing. I don’t know why they did that.

By the year 2001, Paul Kelly was still around but the article did not have much about him, like I had been told. Paul was a drug friend of the Wonderland gang, but also a longtime friend of Wonderland victim, William Deverell.

Harold “Hal” Glickman went into business with Nash in the early 1960s, but now wore a greasy black toupe, fashioned a velvet Elvis painting of a scantily clad woman on the wall behind his desk, and by 2001 sported an Al Davis-like tracksuit, his neck adorned with gold chains – like some variation of a sleazy east coast wise-guy (Google “Angelo Ruggiero” I think or “Fat Ang” as he was known…. Hahaha).

Glickman says Ed has penis surgery in the late 70s and was almost as big as Holmes, but not quite. What the hey…

The interview with Hal alludes to Chris Cox (one of Nash’s friends) but not named, I think – but Hal’s comments are very mean, homophobic and stupid.

When he came to America in the 1950s, Nash originally settled in Vegas, where he opened a bar, married a Lebanese woman and had a daughter. A daughter whom I am told Nash doesn’t speak to anymore. Another kid, an illegitimate son with a Hispanic woman, was murdered in 1984 while Nash sat in state prison (you will see karma play out in this story over and over again for Nash)

Ed was the youngest of three boys, and the Nasrallahs were well-to-do, and in no way struggling or poor, which was always my belief. Sure, he owned a hot dog stand in the 1950s, but that was one of his or the family’s other small businesses. The man got around, and by the 60s he co-owned PJs Club (later Starwood) and even at that time, was known by authorities as someone who broke the rules.

Susan Goldsmith is busy writing, does some activism = has even worked on a documentary film about mothers falsely convicted of “baby-shaking” crimes, where baby deaths are often now attributed to other infant death syndromes. Quite a few women have been freed from prison, due to Susan and her friends’ efforts.

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